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POTEET VICTORY




The Moon of the First Snow II

42" x 42" oil on canvas
$14,800



Arrangement in Beige

48" x 40" oil on canvas
SOLD



Native Falls

48" x 48" oil on canvas
SOLD



Blue Spirit

32" x 24" oil
$6900



MRLN MNRO Mini Print

Mini Print in Floated Open Frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



LVS

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



HWRD HGHS

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



Lu C

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



PL NWMN

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



JCK NKLSN

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



DLLY PRTN

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



CHR

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



JN WYN

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



BTLS

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



LTN JN Mini Print

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



JN WYN

Abbreviated Portrait Series  #16/49
26" x 26" (image size)
34" x 34" framed size



Lu C

Abbreviated Portrait Series #16/49
26" x 26" image size
34" x 34" framed size



JCK NKLSN

Abbreviated Portrait Series #16/49
26" x 26" image size
34" x 34" framed size



Small Elements I

20" x 20" oil on canvas
SOLD



Seeking the Light

60" x 44" oil on canvas
SOLD



RLNG STNS Mini Print

Mini Print in Floated Open Frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



GRGA OKEF Mini Print

Mini Print in Floated Open Frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



Verdant

32" x 32" oil on canvas
SOLD



AN D WRHL

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200



Small Elements II

20" x 20" oil on canvas
SOLD



Small Elements III

20" x 20" oil on canvas
SOLD



Bottom Land

38" x 54" oil on canvas
SOLD



WL E NLSN

Abbreviated Portrait Series (edition of 49)
mini print in floated open frame
12" x 12" (15" x 15" x 2.5" framed)
$1200


If one were to guess the vocation of this strik­ing figure from Oklahoma… rancher, horseman, trades­man would be at first logical, especially upon hearing one of Poteet’s colorful tales of life in Idabel. However, hang around long enough and you are certain to be drawn into an engaging conversation about any number of topics from stories of Harold Stevenson, Warhol or Rauschenberg to an insightful comment about neuroscience, quantum physics or individual awareness. What you would prob­ably not hear from this unaffected artist are how his works have made it in to the personal collections of such inter­esting folks as Anthony Hopkins, Larry Hagman, the late Los Angeles Times publisher Otis Chandler, Madonna, Led Zeppelin’s lead vocalist Robert Plant and Vidal Sassoon. You might notice Patricia Cornwell’s books on the shelf; she is a fan as well. She incorporated Poteet and one of her favorite paintings into her 2008 novel, Scarpetta.

Not everyone appreciates Poteet’s candid and direct per­sonality, but it is difficult not to admire the resolute and constant energy he has devoted to authenticity in both his personal life and his work. His fresh and unconven­tional manner was a sort of fascination to the more ‘so­phisticated’ principals of the New York art scene when Po­teet studied at the Art Students League in the early 1980’s. Harold Stevenson, also from Idabel and Poteet’s mentor (who painted the controversial The New Adam now in the Guggenheim Museum’s permanent collection), made the introductions to Andy Warhol, Rauschenberg and oth­ers. (Note: Harold Stevenson and Poteet were two of six creative artists chosen for the prestigious 100 Year Retro­spective held in Bartlesville, OK in 2007 held at Price Tower. The six honorees selected had each achieved international acclaim and the list included authors, performers and artists.) Harold Stevenson, one of ‘The New Realists’, helped Andy Warhol get his first exhibition, and often invited Poteet to join their groups of notables as he knew Poteet would pleasantly shock and delight with his fresh insight.

This facet of Poteet’s personality has fueled thirty years of painting. Often, artists are susceptible to influence by the world of commercialism, ‘artspeak’ (as Poteet puts it)—or critics...or admir­ers—Poteet has remained authentic. He has a wide range of styles but several elements remain constant… Poteet’s powerful command of composition, color, shape and his proprietary finish time after time create breathtaking pieces that evoke powerful responses.

Solo Exhibitions

McLarry Modern, Santa Fe, NM—Aug 2009, 2010, 2011

McLarry Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM—Aug 2007, 2008

Gallery 225, Santa Fe, NM—Aug 2006

Patricia Carlisle Gallery, Santa Fe, NM—

Aug 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Primavera Gallery, Ojai, CA—2002, 2004

Oklahoma State Capitol, A Native Son’s Creative Gift—

May 18-July 5,1998

Meyer Gallery Scottsdale, AZ—Feb 12,1998

Contemporary Southwest Gallery, Santa Fe, NM—

Aug 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999

Expressions in Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM—Dec 1994

Selected Collections

Almiranta Chorruca—Mallorca, Spain

American Entertainer, Madonna

Author, Patricia Cornwell

British Stage and Movie Actor, Sir Philip Anthony Hopkins

Burt’s Bees Original Founder, Sunny Justice

Darrell Keith Law Firm—Ft. Worth, Texas

D2 Consulting—Brooklyn, Minnesota

Horizons Health Care Corporation—Hutchinson, Kansas

Raymond James Financial—St. Petersburg, Florida

Lead Led Zeppelin Singer, Robert Plant

Los Alamos National Bank—Santa Fe, New Mexico

Los Angeles Times Publisher, Otis Chandler

Mark Sakautzky Interior Design—Hamburg, Germany

Milagro Computer Systems—Austin, Texas

Piper Industries—Orlando, Florida

Schmidt Sportsworld—Essen, Germany

Suncare Health Inc.—Tallahassee, Florida

University of Oklahoma College of Law—Norman, Oklahoma

Vidal Sassoon

Watson & Barnes—Raleigh, North Carolina

Williams Companies, Inc.—Tulsa, Oklahoma

Selected Article

Santa Fean Magazine Aug/Sept 2011

By Devon Jackson

Spend any amount of engaged time with Poteet Victory and you’ll soon realize it’s not unlike the feeling you get when tak­ing in his paintings. What initially strikes you as simple, straight­forward, and down to earth gradually deepens, increasing in complexity and nuance. His paintings, most of them decidedly abstract, aim for and explore the spiritual, primarily through color and form at their most essential. And Victory himself, once you get past the soft Sooner twang, the aw-shucks demeanor, and the ranching and rodeo background, is as sophisticated and informed an artist as you’ll ever meet.

Get him to talking about his most recent and ongoing series, Abbreviated Portraits, for instance, and he’ll reference every­thing from the latest neuroscientific takes on the way the brain processes and remembers images to Joseph Campbell’s icono­graphic studies of mythology to Marcel Proust’s insights into the way smell triggers memory. Not that he puts any of this across didactically, or that it’s at all striving or trying to impress. Quite the opposite. And that’s what’s so disarming and what warms you up to both Victory and to his paintings. His art ex­udes its creator’s humility as much as his intellect.

In a life of turning points, one of the first and deepest for Vic­tory, who grew up in a family of roughnecks in cow punching Idabel, Oklahoma, was his encounter, at age 15, with fellow Idabellan Harold Stephenson, an accomplished painter who’d moved to New York City and so charmed Andy Warhol that the Pop artist named his first film after him. “I’d been rodeoing bulls and riding horses bareback,” recalls Victory, now 64. “After on of the rodeos Stephenson came up to me and asked if I’d pose as Alexander the Great. He needed someone who could sit on a horse in his studio. So I posed for him over the next two sum­mers. He’d talk about art and the philosophy of art. That really stuck with me.”

After serving in the Army, learning silk-screening in Maui, and then founding and, in 1980, selling off a successful T-shirt busi­ness, Victory lit out for the Arts Students League in New York, where he again hooked up with Stephenson (who introduced him to Warhol and to Rauschenberg) and honed his emerging skills as a fine artist fifteen years later, after having returned to Oklahoma (and after his wife asked him for a divorce), Victory moved to Santa Fe, where, within weeks, he was bartending at Vanessie. ‘It was the perfect thing for a person like me,” he says. “I didn’t know anybody and through that job I got to meet ev­erybody.” The owner soon hung up some of his works, which quickly sold. By 1991, he was painting full-time.


Since then, Victory (who’s 3/8 Cherokee and Choctaw) has abandoned realism and Native imager almost entirely. And brushes, “I’m a lot more comfortable with a knife than a brush,” he says, “so I paint everything on the knife. And I actually don’t paint; I sculpt.” Lately he’s been “sculpting” away on his potentially ground-breaking series Abbreviated Portraits, wherein he has distilled a person down to his or her archetypal essence. Having come up with the idea from texting (and the way people abridge their words when doing so), these pieces are as much about surface and color as his other works have always been coveted for. (Madonna, Robert Plant, and Anthony Hopkins are among his collectors.) This series’ abbreviations of Paul Newman, John Wayne, and Dolly Parton, however, reflect not only our ADD-ish times, but also gibe with Victory’s creative and spiri­tual pursuits. His premise is that our brains store information consciously and subconsciously mostly in basic shapes and forms, and therefore we share the same references for certain images–for Newman, Wayne, Cher. “So when I come up with these abstract shapes and forms,” says Victory excitedly, “I see them, and I know you’re seeing them, too.”

Subliminally, or cosmically, they inspire a ruckus at McLarry Modern on Canyon Road–and with Stephenson and others. “They’ve become a phenomenon here at the gallery,” marvels Victory. “And after Harold saw them he told me. You have got to keep pursuing this. This destroys modern art.”